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OSCIA-Delivered Program Guides

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On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $20,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to undertake a new practiceA new practice is a practice that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres included in the application. For example, if you have never used cover crops on a field and wish to plant cover crops for the first time.of cover cropping or intercropping of cover crops and leave them undisturbed over the winter (i.e., the crop cannot be chemically or physically terminated in the fall or winter). A new practice is a practice that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres being applied for and can include planting cover crops to be left over-winter either for the first-time or where they have previously been terminated or harvested in the fall.

If a cover crop being applied for is to be harvested or grazed, a minimum of 6 inches of growth must be left undisturbed over winter (November to March). Approved projects must result in a planted cover crop in 2024.

On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $20,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to undertake a new practiceA new practice is a practice that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres included in the application. For example, if you have never used cover crops on a field and wish to plant cover crops for the first time.of cover cropping or intercropping of cover crops and leave them undisturbed over the winter (i.e., the crop cannot be chemically or physically terminated in the fall or winter). A new practice is a practice that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres being applied for and can include planting cover crops to be left over-winter either for the first-time or where they have previously been terminated or harvested in the fall.

If a cover crop being applied for is to be harvested or grazed, a minimum of 6 inches of growth must be left undisturbed over winter (November to March). Approved projects must result in a planted cover crop in 2024.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$1,000/acre for rejuvenating existing grasslands to support diverse, multi-species native perennial grassland

$3,000/acre for establishing diverse, multi-species native perennial grasslands on marginal and high-risk annual croplands
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the costs associated with the establishment and long-term maintenance of native perennial grasslands on marginal/lower productivity agricultural landscapes in Ontario. A grassland is dominated by grasses rather than by trees, as in a forest. Growing with the grasses are many other kinds of non-grassy herbaceous plants known by the collective name of “forbs”. On moist soils, prairie blends into marshlands dominated by sedges rather than grasses (adapted from Tallgrass Ontario).

Native grasslands result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits. Native grasslands are often best suited to wet, sloping, poor-soil, or otherwise marginal fields.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$1,000/acre for rejuvenating existing grasslands to support diverse, multi-species native perennial grassland

$3,000/acre for establishing diverse, multi-species native perennial grasslands on marginal and high-risk annual croplands
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the costs associated with the establishment and long-term maintenance of native perennial grasslands on marginal/lower productivity agricultural landscapes in Ontario. A grassland is dominated by grasses rather than by trees, as in a forest. Growing with the grasses are many other kinds of non-grassy herbaceous plants known by the collective name of “forbs”. On moist soils, prairie blends into marshlands dominated by sedges rather than grasses (adapted from Tallgrass Ontario).

Native grasslands result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits. Native grasslands are often best suited to wet, sloping, poor-soil, or otherwise marginal fields.

On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $30,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to implement a practice that is new to the acres being applied for, within their field-based nitrogen management activities. A new practice is one that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres included in the application. For example, if you have side-dressed nitrogen in the past, but now you want to side-dress with a dual action nitrogen stabilizer, only the use of the stabilizer would be considered eligible as a new practice. The costs associated with side-dressing are not considered new and are therefore not eligible.

On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $30,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to implement a practice that is new to the acres being applied for, within their field-based nitrogen management activities. A new practice is one that has not been previously implemented by the applicant on the acres included in the application. For example, if you have side-dressed nitrogen in the past, but now you want to side-dress with a dual action nitrogen stabilizer, only the use of the stabilizer would be considered eligible as a new practice. The costs associated with side-dressing are not considered new and are therefore not eligible.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$500/acre for establishing and maintaining of perennial biomass crops on lands currently in annual crop production

$1,000/acre for establishing perennial biomass crops on marginal and high-risk lands currently in annual crop production
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the planting/establishment and on-going maintenance of perennial biomass crops (e.g., switchgrass) on annual cropland in Ontario.

Increasing the frequency of perennial biomass crops in annual crop rotations and conversion of marginal and high-risk annual croplands to perennial biomass crops results in more resilient agricultural landscapes, with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion and provide many other ecological benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$500/acre for establishing and maintaining of perennial biomass crops on lands currently in annual crop production

$1,000/acre for establishing perennial biomass crops on marginal and high-risk lands currently in annual crop production
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the planting/establishment and on-going maintenance of perennial biomass crops (e.g., switchgrass) on annual cropland in Ontario.

Increasing the frequency of perennial biomass crops in annual crop rotations and conversion of marginal and high-risk annual croplands to perennial biomass crops results in more resilient agricultural landscapes, with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion and provide many other ecological benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$500/acre for establishing and maintaining perennial warm season pastures on lands currently in annual crop rotations

$1,000/acre for establishing and maintaining perennial warm season pastures on marginal and high-risk lands currently in annual crop rotations
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the planting/establishment and on-going maintenance of perennial warm season grasses for improving pastures.

Increasing the frequency of plantings of perennial warm season grasses as part of pasture management results in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$500/acre for establishing and maintaining perennial warm season pastures on lands currently in annual crop rotations

$1,000/acre for establishing and maintaining perennial warm season pastures on marginal and high-risk lands currently in annual crop rotations
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the planting/establishment and on-going maintenance of perennial warm season grasses for improving pastures.

Increasing the frequency of plantings of perennial warm season grasses as part of pasture management results in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$30/acre for moderate reductions to tillage practices

$50/acre for more substantial reductions to tillage practices
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports farmers who want to implement a new practice of no-till, strip-till or minimum tillage, and ultimately increase the number of acres under reduced tillage on annual cropland in Ontario.

Reduced tillage practices result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$30/acre for moderate reductions to tillage practices

$50/acre for more substantial reductions to tillage practices
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports farmers who want to implement a new practice of no-till, strip-till or minimum tillage, and ultimately increase the number of acres under reduced tillage on annual cropland in Ontario.

Reduced tillage practices result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological benefits.

On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $20,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to establish new rotational grazing systems or expand acreage of existing systems for livestock. Rotational grazing systems must be implemented on at least 10 acres of pasture and must include at least four (4) sections (paddocks) for rotation to be considered eligible for cost-share funding.

On-Farm Climate Action Fund

65% of eligible project costs, up to a maximum cost-share payment of $20,000 per project
Not Accepting Applications
For farmers who want to establish new rotational grazing systems or expand acreage of existing systems for livestock. Rotational grazing systems must be implemented on at least 10 acres of pasture and must include at least four (4) sections (paddocks) for rotation to be considered eligible for cost-share funding.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$1,000/acre for rejuvenating existing tree and/or shrub windbreak, shelterbelt, or riparian buffer plantings to increase density and reduce erosion risks

$3,000/acre for establishing new tree and/or shrub windbreaks, shelterbelts, riparian buffers, or block plantings
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the rejuvenation of existing or establishment of new tree and/or shrub plantings on agricultural landscapes in Ontario.

Tree and shrub plantings result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological and water quality benefits. To learn more about the benefits of trees on agricultural lands, visit Trees on farms | ontario.ca.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$1,000/acre for rejuvenating existing tree and/or shrub windbreak, shelterbelt, or riparian buffer plantings to increase density and reduce erosion risks

$3,000/acre for establishing new tree and/or shrub windbreaks, shelterbelts, riparian buffers, or block plantings
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the rejuvenation of existing or establishment of new tree and/or shrub plantings on agricultural landscapes in Ontario.

Tree and shrub plantings result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological and water quality benefits. To learn more about the benefits of trees on agricultural lands, visit Trees on farms | ontario.ca.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$6,000/acre for rejuvenating an existing water retention feature and/or shallow groundwater type feature (minimum depth 15 feet after rejuvenation)

$10,000/acre for establishing a new water retention feature and/or lined reservoir type feature (minimum depth 15 feet)
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the rejuvenation or the establishment of water retention or shallow groundwater type features on agricultural landscapes in Ontario. The feature must be a minimum of 15 feet deep to qualify for funding.

Water retention features result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to help farmers adapt to changing climate conditions and manage fluctuations in water resources, creating more resilient agricultural production and providing many other ecological and water quality benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$6,000/acre for rejuvenating an existing water retention feature and/or shallow groundwater type feature (minimum depth 15 feet after rejuvenation)

$10,000/acre for establishing a new water retention feature and/or lined reservoir type feature (minimum depth 15 feet)
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the rejuvenation or the establishment of water retention or shallow groundwater type features on agricultural landscapes in Ontario. The feature must be a minimum of 15 feet deep to qualify for funding.

Water retention features result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to help farmers adapt to changing climate conditions and manage fluctuations in water resources, creating more resilient agricultural production and providing many other ecological and water quality benefits.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$15,000/acre for restoring the function and/or increasing the acreage of an existing wetland and/or reverting marginal agricultural land into wetlands

$25,000/acre for establishing a new wetland, where excavation is required to change topography within the area
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the restoration or establishment of wetlands on agricultural landscapes in Ontario.

Wetlands result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological and water quality benefits. Wetlands are areas that are either covered or saturated with water at some times of the year.

Resilient Agricultural Landscape Program

$15,000/acre for restoring the function and/or increasing the acreage of an existing wetland and/or reverting marginal agricultural land into wetlands

$25,000/acre for establishing a new wetland, where excavation is required to change topography within the area
Accepting Applications
RALP funding supports the restoration or establishment of wetlands on agricultural landscapes in Ontario.

Wetlands result in more resilient agricultural landscapes with an increased ability to sequester carbon, reduce soil erosion, and provide many other ecological and water quality benefits. Wetlands are areas that are either covered or saturated with water at some times of the year.